May 122011
 

I have spent the last couple of days reviewing my reference management system (or lack thereof) and looking for alternatives.  I like to save articles and website links I find online and through journal alerts and blogs so I can use them for case studies and examples in lectures and assignments.  For the last couple of years, I have organized this material by creating a folder for each lecture topic (current and possible new ones), with the intention that when it came time to update a lecture, I could just browse through my files.  The problem is I still manage to forget where I put articles, or duplicate them (sometimes several times), and there is no elegant way to cross-reference them if they are relevant to more than one topic (I use shortcuts, but it’s a clunky method).  So now that the term is over and my study-leave is underway, what better time to take a step back and review my reference management methods?

I have given both Zotero and Mendeley a try and have found both to have their strengths and weaknesses.  I won’t attempt to write full reviews or comparisons of them, as many others have already done this.  My quick analysis is that Zotero’s interface is okay, but limited since it runs inside Firefox (a standalone version is in the works).  Mendeley’s is much better, although it would be so much more efficient if you could see a separate PDF preview pane while looking at your list of articles to review (Zotero has this via the Firefox browser).  Mendeley’s winning feature for me was the easy method for ingesting and renaming my collection of existing PDF files.  With Zotero, I had to select each file individually in order to have the software rename it with a standardized format, which got very tedious, very quickly.  By the way, I should say that I take no sides in the open source vs. proprietary battle – I go strictly on functionality and usability (even just mentioning these two on Twitter triggered a mini debate from adherents on both sides).  For now, I’m going to keep working with Mendeley, as I think it will do what I need and is pretty easy to pick up.  When Zotero releases a standalone version, I will definitely have another look.  I may try some others that have been suggested to me via Twitter, such as CiteULike and academia.edu, but I really just want to get on with it!    I have dumped all of my PDF files into one folder with the fervent hope that one of these will give me a fast and efficient way to search my collection by keyword and tags so I can pull together a short reading list for teaching and writing purposes.  It’s funny – I feel like I’m late to the whole reference management software party, and yet none of the current crop of solutions strikes me as being fully baked yet.

I am trying OneNote as a repository for making notes on teaching and blog topics.  I gave OneNote a serious try a few years ago, but just couldn’t get into the habit.  At that time I felt that, whatever I produced in OneNote would eventually be transferred to a Microsoft Word or PowerPoint document as a finished product, so why not just start there?  However, I’m finding that there is no easy way to organize a large number of topics, subtopics, pages, web snippets, etc. with that method.  So, it’s back to OneNote once again.  I like the fact that I can sync it with my SkyDrive and access it from any computer or even from their iPhone app (if they ever release it outside the U.S., that is – grrrr).  I have heard of EverNote but have not tried it as, from what I understand, OneNote is better integrated with the Microsoft Office suite, which I use heavily.

I have been amazed at how many files I have, and I’m always looking for better ways to organize everything.  Hopefully all the time I’m spending now reorganizing these files and links and test-driving various software and organizational methods will pay off in the future.  If they do and I adapt/improve my workflow, I will follow up with more details.

What method and/or software do you use to keep track of all your teaching material?

 

May 062011
 

It’s not much of a stretch to say that most GIS instructors are likely also techies (Mirriam-Webster: “a person who is very knowledgeable or enthusiastic about technology”), myself included.  It follows then, that we would also be interested in exploring the use of technology for how we teach, not just what we teach.  I attended an on-campus Educational Technology Workshop yesterday and, like many there, was struck by the level of attendance and interest.  There were some great talks on lecture capture, providing a “web option” for an in-class course, and using clickers and tablets in the classroom.   I have been considering a number of possible new ways of teaching with technology, and find that I have to remember to ask myself the following:

  • What is the problem this new technology will help me solve?
  • Is there actually a problem, or am I just being tempted by the latest thing?
  • Will students learn more, or faster, or more effectively?
  • Will it improve the student experience?
  • What is the learning curve for me, and for my students?
  • What are the long term implications/obligations for maintenance and improvement both in time and money?

It’s one thing for me to enjoy being an early adopter, but many of the things I try are discarded (e.g., I bought a Bluetooth GPS for my laptop before the days of smartphones, and never once got it to work – it makes a good paperweight).  However, I am much more conservative about using the same approach with how I teach my students.  I know they appreciate my efforts to improve their learning experience, but I have to be careful I don’t invest a lot of time and/or money only to find out something doesn’t work or actually make things worse.  Having said that, part of what I will be doing over the next few months is spending time researching new teaching methods, exploring options, and thinking about what I might do to take advantage of my techie nature in a way that improves my teaching.  Can’t wait!

Are you using technology to teach GIS?  If so, I would love to hear what you’re doing and how it’s working…

 

Apr 292011
 

In my last post, on GIS training vs. education at university, I referred to a paper by Fagin and Wikle (2011) who had conducted a survey of GIS instructors in the U.S. regarding perceptions of the importance of various GIS subject areas.  One finding that I thought deserved its own post was that “Most respondants (65.9%) indicated that programming was either not covered/unimportant or only tangentially important” (p. 7, italics by original authors, boldface added).  I found this fascinating, as it appears to be so at odds with the general impression I have, via Twitter and elsewhere, that anything to do with GIS and programming is the hottest thing out there and where all the jobs are.  Perhaps this perception is biased, as I find that more developers seem to be on Twitter, and highly active on it as well, compared with other GIS practitioners.  I still wonder though, why do so many instructors dismiss programming as not an important topic when teaching GIS?

This is just a guess, but one reason may be that many of the instructors surveyed have little or no programming background themselves, and so don’t teach it (myself included).  I took programming in high school and first-year university many years ago, and have taken ArcObjects and VBA courses since then.  Although my programming skills are now virtually non-existent, I have benefitted greatly from having a basic understanding of it (e.g., loops, subroutines, if-then statements).  Having said that, I don’t teach programming in any of my courses, and have long wrestled with this.  My experience has been that programming is not something most introductory or “general” GIS students want (and may actually scare them off), but that it is likely more appealing to the advanced students who may be considering a GIS-related career.  Just to be clear: I’m not one of those instructors who thinks programming is not important, but I am one who would have say it is “not covered”.  One of the things on my study leave to-do list is to consider adding something like an introduction to Python section to my advanced GIS course.

Another possible reason for this lack of programming in university GIS curricula may also be that instructors see it as being too far towards the training end of the spectrum.  Does programming fall under training or education?  My thinking is that learning how to program (the actual process of coding) may be more training-oriented, but knowing what to code and why requires education as well.  Regardless, it appears from the results of the Fagin and Wikle study that, even though GIS-related programming appears to be in high demand, the people who are getting those jobs likely did not acquire those skills at a traditional four-year university, or at least not through its GIS courses (I may be completely wrong on this though, so please feel free to correct me).

I was chatting with a computer science professor about this yesterday, and his suggestion was that I recommend one of his department’s first-year courses that introduces students to programming by using Python.  I think this could be a great course for some of my GIS students who want to augment their GIS courses.  Additionally, I am considering including at least a brief introduction to Python as part of a section I am revising and expanding on ModelBuilder and geoprocessing.  The questions I’m currently thinking about are: can I really provide much of an effective introduction in perhaps 4 hours of class time?  I would love to have a whole new course on this, but don’t have the time in my teaching schedule, nor the expertise to mount such a course at this point.  Or should I just point those that are interested towards a more general-purpose Python course in the computer science department?  In a recent LinkedIn discussion (in the GIS, Mapping and Geo Technology group) about what languages a new GIS professional should learn, Python definitely came out as the favourite, but are there others?  Finally, is programming becoming as essential as I think it is, or is it still beyond what a typical GIS professional (if there is such a thing) should be expected to do?  If GIS developers didn’t get their programming background from a university GIS curriculum, where did they get it? So many questions!  If you have any comments, I would love to hear them.

 

Reference

Fagin, Todd D. and Thomas A. Wikle.  2011.  The instructor element of GIS instruction at US colleges and Universities, Transactions in GIS, 15(1): 1-15.

 

 

Apr 212011
 

Many undergraduate university students take GIS courses with the expectation that these courses will increase their chances of finding gainful employment upon graduation.  While I believe that the GIS courses I teach can help students develop marketable skills, I think that there are sometimes differing opinions between instructor and student about what students should learn, what will help them in the short vs. long term, and what the right balance should be between education and training.  This was highlighted in a recent article by Fagin and Wikle (2011) entitled “The instructor element of GIS instruction at US colleges and universities”.  The authors do a nice job of summarizing the evolution of GIS instruction and instructors, and then report the results of a survey they conducted of American GIS instructors and “their perceptions concerning the importance of various GIS subject areas” (p. 1).  One passage that really jumped out at me concerns the challenges GIS instructors face:

For instance, one respondent lamented the problems of balancing the intellectual foundations of GIS with the desires of students wanting little more than software training. This sentiment was further reflected by another respondent’s recognition that many students across institutional types are seeking training to better prepare for the workforce, while many faculty are more concerned with research and the theoretical side of GIS. Nonetheless, regardless of the emphasis placed on theoretical considerations, respondents from all institutional types and educational levels signaled the importance of teaching software functionality and other practical applications of GIS.  (p. 10)

In the first class of my introductory GIS course, I explain the difference between education and training (based on definitions I heard Michael Goodchild give at a conference talk many years ago), and tell them I try to do both, but with more emphasis on education.  This is based on my belief that the underlying theoretical concepts as well as the critical thinking, problem-solving, and communication skills I hope to impart will serve them well, long after they have forgotten which buttons to push to perform a particular function with certain software.  It’s important that students see the value in the education aspect, both to manage their expectations from the start, and also to fuel their motivation once they see that value.  Beyond that, there are many opportunities for further software training once they’re out in the workforce, while it is much more difficult and time-consuming to get more education.

It seems to me that there is no clear separation between education and training, theory and practice, but that it is more of a continuum.  I always emphasize in my courses that students should know why they execute certain steps or choose particular parameters in a dialog box and not just memorize them, and that they should understand (conceptually, at least) what steps the software is going through to perform a particular function.  In other words, when it comes to GIS, I don’t know how you can have one without the other.

So what is the right mix of education and training that will best prepare students for life after graduation?  As I mentioned in a previous post, I sometimes have to remind myself that the majority of my students will not pursue GIS-related careers.  For them, one or two GIS courses is enough, so I try to give them a solid understanding of basic GIS concepts and the software skills they will need to perform simple mapping and analysis.  Beyond that though, I want to help them learn to think spatially, and to be able to critically analyze maps and other geographic information that they will encounter in their lives, both through work and elsewhere.

For those students who take more courses with me and are more likely to pursue GIS-related careers, I continue the process of building a solid theoretical foundation as well as teaching the practical skills they will need in order to be able to learn more on their own.  I think most GIS practitioners would agree that much of what you learn is self-taught while on the job.  When you have a task to complete or a problem to solve, you must have the requisite combination of conceptual understanding, problem-solving skills, and knowledge of the software to be able figure it out and get the job done successfully.  You have to be able to think, learn, analyze, problem-solve and then effectively communicate your results to someone else.  The software training I provide will help them get that first job, but the conceptual and theoretical understanding and the critical thinking and problem-solving skills (the education component) will continue to help them as the software changes and their professional role evolves.

 

Reference

Fagin, Todd D. and Thomas A. Wikle.  2011.  The instructor element of GIS instruction at US colleges and Universities, Transactions in GIS, 15(1): 1-15.

 

Apr 152011
 

This morning I spent 3 hours watching my students write their final exam.  It’s a strange experience, as I want them all to do well, but know that some will and some won’t, for a whole host of reasons.  You might think that spending 3 hours pacing around a room might be dull (and I admit sometimes it can be), but I usually find myself a bit on edge.  Stressed is too strong a word, but I definitely have some nervous tension.  Why?  One reason is that the students are stressed, which tends to rub off on me.  Another reason is that I always wonder if I have made the test too difficult or too easy.  In a 3 hour exam, if all of the students are still there at the very end, some on the verge of tears, then I can only conclude that I made it too long and/or too difficult (when I first started teaching, this happened more than once).  If they all leave after the first hour of a three-hour exam, with big smiles and a spring in their step, then I probably made it too short and/or too easy (this doesn’t happen too often).  I always remember chatting with a senior colleague, when I was still a rookie and he was on the verge of retirement, who told me that after all his years of teaching he still could never be sure how a particular group of students would do on a test.  At this stage, I usually have a fairly good idea, but you still never know for sure.  I design my exams to take about 2-2.5 hours to complete and I give them 3, so that time is not a factor in their performance.  Others may think differently, but I feel I can adequately survey their knowledge of the course in that time, and I know that students appreciate this approach.

Another source of tension comes from the fear that I have made some egregious and undiscovered error when I created the exam.  Sure enough, two minutes after the students started this morning, one of them politely pointed out to me that questions 2 and 3 were identical – aaagh!  I hate it when I do that!  I must have proofread that exam five times before submitting it for duplication, but still managed to miss the mistake.  It wasn’t a huge problem, as excluding one of the duplicates made the exam out of 77 instead of 80, but it still bugs me.  Fortunately, those errors are rare (really!).  At this point, I should mention that, if you are a former, current, or future student of mine, I don’t want you to think that I’m on the verge of a nervous breakdown during every exam – I do manage to keep myself together.  :-)

On a more positive note, the best part of a final exam (for me at least) is when I know I’ve set a reasonable exam, and a student finishes, confidently hands it in, thanks me for the course, and wishes me a great summer.  I love it when students do well, and it’s so satisfying when it’s clear that they liked the course, learned the material, and did well enough on the exam that they have a smile on their face at the end.

Apr 082011
 

I had my last class of the term on Tuesday and will not be teaching again until January, 2012.  I have been approved for a half-sabbatical which officially starts July 1, but I am gearing up for it already.  The official term is “study leave”, but most people tend to call it a sabbatical.  The first thing to clarify is that “sabbatical” is not a synonym for “vacation”.  No matter how many times I try to explain this to family and friends, they still seem to believe that I will spend more time golfing than working.  If only!  Another sabbatical myth is that many people assume that I must be travelling to some exotic land for an extended stay.  That would be nice but the sad reality is that, in the eternal time-money equation, I will gain time but lose part of my pay.  So when I tell people I’m going on sabbatical, and they automatically ask “Are you going anywhere?” my answer is “yes, my office”.  I’m not complaining though.  A sabbatical is an incredibly valuable opportunity to take a step back from the usual routine and review and refresh my thinking.

So, what am I going to do with all this free time?  My position as a senior lecturer is in what our university calls the “teaching stream”.  This means that I am a full-time, permanent faculty member who specializes in teaching, and I’m not expected to have a research program.  Thus, my study-leave will be spent reading up on the scholarship of teaching and learning, evaluating new teaching methods (e.g., blended learning), revising my teaching material (lectures, assignments, tests), and engaging in professional development (e.g., online courses such as ESRI’s online training and webinars such as Adobe’s Captivate series).  As much as I will miss being in the classroom, I can’t wait to get started!

I am in the planning stages at the moment.  The last time I had a sabbatical I was far too ambitious, even though I had a full year.  The irony was that, because I felt as though I had so much time, I got incredibly ambitious, and then spent a lot of that time stressed because I hadn’t accomplished everything I had planned.  A colleague of mine said he went through the same thing.  This time I’m trying to be more realistic and have been working on prioritizing and scheduling phases and tasks.  My goals range from the big and broad (e.g., curriculum planning, new teaching strategies) to the specific and technical (e.g., redesigning my PowerPoint slides; incorporating ModelBuilder into an efficient workflow for content creation for lectures and assignments; trying to master editing in ArcGIS 10).  I plan to blog about it all along the way, and look forward to sharing what I’m doing.

Mar 312011
 

Every summer, I perform a self-imposed curriculum review of the five GIS courses I teach each year.  I think about the topics included and their sequence, and which course they belong in.  I make notes to myself throughout the year about what topics need work, what examples worked well or fell flat, or what new ideas I want to try out.  Some of these notes are made on hidden slides right in the PowerPoint file (e.g., Edit: break the following slide into three separate slides with a map example for each) and some in a Word file with headings for each course as well as for things like PowerPoint design, workflow, and administration.

Four of the courses I teach are in a sequence: introduction, intermediate, advanced, and a capstone project course (the fifth is an introductory GIS course at the graduate level).  I start out with about 160 students in the first course, and then lose about half with each subsequent course, ending up with about 20 in the capstone course.  The tricky part is trying to decide what students should learn if they are going to take only one GIS course vs. those who take two, or three, or four.  I wish it were as easy as consulting the GIS & T Body of Knowledge and/or the Geospatial Technology Competency Model and following a template, but it’s not that simple.

It seems as though I have three sets of students: those who just want one GIS course, often to satisfy a degree requirement for a “methods” course; those who take two courses, because they have heard that GIS is a marketable skill and hope that two will be “enough” to help them get a job; and those who take three or four, and see GIS as something that has the potential to become a substantial part of their careers (I realize these are generalizations, but I have a hunch they are roughly accurate, although it makes me think I should really conduct a survey).

What are the objectives for an introductory GIS course? When I first started teaching, a colleague of mine told me “just give them enough to make them dangerous”.  I know he was trying to be funny, but I actually took it as a warning and a challenge.  The last thing I wanted was for students, for which this would be their only GIS course, to finish the course  thinking they had a certain mastery of GIS when, as the joke implied, they would be unwittingly making all sorts of egregious errors and assumptions, churning out spurious results and coming to erroneous conclusions, all thanks to me!

If my introductory course really is the only GIS course half of the students will take, then I want to make sure that they are able to: find data sets and judge whether they are appropriate (by knowing about and critically appraising the metadata); choose an appropriate map projection; edit attribute tables and do field calculations; perform spatial and attribute queries; apply spatial problem-solving skills to formulate and execute basic analysis using distance and overlay; and then create a well-designed map that incorporates basic cartographic principles to clearly communicate the information and message they want to convey.  I am trying to be realistic about how much I can fit into a 12 week term and what a student should be able to accomplish once they have completed the course.  All along the way, I try to emphasize the why as much as the how, so that students can make informed decisions at each stage of a project instead of relying on simply remembering a sequence of procedures.  The challenge is to balance the development of functional skills with the creation of a strong theoretical foundation, so that students are well prepared both technically and conceptually.

The topics in the intermediate and advanced courses are not as tightly connected to each other.  For half of the students in the intermediate course, that will be their last GIS course, so I make sure to cover other popular and/or practical skills and topics they might need such as digitizing, geocoding, basic remote sensing concepts, raster analysis, and geoprocessing using ModelBuilder.  My advanced course includes topics such as GPS, terrain analysis, surface interpolation, and GIS design and implementation.

My annual curriculum review is something that I look forward to.  It gives me the opportunity to shake off the day-to-day concerns that often preoccupy me during the school year and take a fresh look at what I can improve for the next time around.  As always, I would love to hear your thoughts – what guides your choice of topics for a given course?

 

Mar 242011
 

Simultaneously published at the ESRI Education Community Blog with thanks to Dr.  Tom Baker, Education Manager, ESRI Inc.

Many people working in the cross-disciplinary field of GIS education may have few co-workers in their organization that they can learn from, brainstorm ideas, or even just “talk shop”.  They may be looking for ways that they can keep up with the latest trends, opinions, and best practices.  A great way to do this is through social media, which allow you to become connected with others who share your interests, resulting in the building of a community around those interests.

The key to community building is to make direct, personal connections with those that have shared interests.  Traditionally, this was done by attending formal meetings and conferences.  However, social media, such as Twitter, have allowed quantum leaps to be made in finding and making these connections.  With searching and filtering, it is easy to quickly find people who share your professional interests.  Once you have found even a few people, by looking at who they follow, you can rapidly build a tightly focused list of people that share your interests.  Not only that, but you will be able to read their posts in real time, which is an amazing way to keep abreast of the latest topics and events.  What many people may not realize is that one of the real powers of Twitter is not the 140 character posts themselves, but the links that people share through their tweets.  When you follow a number of people with similar interests, you have access to their collective intellectual activity, where they share information that might be hard for you to find on your own, such as a blog post they found, or a press release, or a new article on something you may find useful.

While sharing links via Twitter is a powerful source of information that you might not otherwise find, engaging in actual conversations with those you follow is a powerful way to create personal connections that you might not otherwise have.  Twitter, and other social media (including writing comments on blogs), can provide immediate and informal access to people that you might not otherwise be able to meet.  The real benefits of social media come when you begin to share your own thoughts, and begin having conversations with others.  You may then find that some of these people will be attending events that you are also going to.  This can lead to the odd but amazing feeling you experience when you finally meet face to face with someone you have been following and interacting with virtually for months or even years.  While it may seem that social media might compete with, or even replace, face-to-face interactions, the actual effect is to make those interactions more likely, more frequent, and richer.  Membership in associations and attending regional meetings and national or international conferences become more rewarding when you know you will find people there you already “know” online.  By leveraging the power of social media, you can create one (or several) personalized communities around any interest.  This can be an effective way to become more connected to others in your field, which can improve your job performance and lead to a more enriching professional experience.

Useful links:

Esri Education Team on Twitter: http://esriurl.com/edtwitter

Esri GIS in Schools at Facebook:  http://facebook.com/schoolGIS

 

Mar 172011
 

I am currently in the process of re-evaluating my PowerPoint slide designs and templates that I use for my lectures.  As a rough estimate, I have somewhere between 2,000 and 3,000 slides spread over many files.  Over the last ten years, I have used the same template for all of them, with minor modifications.  In the next few months, I plan to give them an overhaul – update the designs and screenshots (there are still some Windows XP slides lurking in some of my files, which really stick out now, and not in a good way), experiment with new layouts, graphics, and content.  I have just bought some books that I’m sure will be very helpful in this process, including Slide:ology by Nancy Duarte, Presentation Zen and Presentation Zen Design by Garr Reynolds, and the Non-Designer’s Presentation Book by Robin Williams.  I like to think I’m fairly good at slide design and presentation, but I also know there is much more I can learn.  Some of what they recommend is old hat to me (e.g., less text, more graphics) or cliché (the expression “death by PowerPoint” is so overused but, sadly, still often needed) but I am voraciously reading all of these books to broaden my thinking for presentation design and execution.

So, on the topic of slide design, I thought I would share a couple of tips that might be helpful when using ArcGIS maps in PowerPoint.  First, I design maps specifically for use as slides whenever possible.  If you have the time, your audience will notice the difference (the small fonts and pastel shades often used for print maps just don’t translate well when projected for any kind of larger audience).  In ArcMap, create a custom page size that matches the dimensions you want to use, such as 7.5 x 10 inches for a map that will fill a traditional slide (sometimes I make them 6×10 inches to leave room at the top for a title).  Then set the data frame size to be the same as the page, with no offset or margin.

ArcMap layout for a PowerPoint slide
Custom ArcMap page layout for PowerPoint. Here my map will be 6 inches high to leave room for a title above.

Create your map, keeping in mind that the colour schemes, line weights, and symbol sizes should be slightly exaggerated.  I tend to use somewhat brighter, more vibrant colours for PowerPoint than I would for a print map, especially if the room I will present in won’t be that dark.  You also want the message you are communicating with your map to be easily grasped in a few seconds (this may also be true for print, but I think more so for presentation).  I then export the map from ArcMap as a 200 dpi jpeg file.  If 200 dpi seems like overkill, it often is, but it gives me more flexibility if I later want to enlarge and crop the map.  The trade-off in file size is worth it for me, but you may want to go with a smaller image resolution.  I then add the map into PowerPoint.  I usually cut and paste the legend from ArcMap directly into PowerPoint so I have the option of moving it later if I want to add a label or other text to the map.

When adding attribute tables to PowerPoint, follow the same guidelines for text size you would use for any other slide text.  In other words, the attribute table text should be BIG.  I often see presentations where people fail to do this and I always think “Why show an attribute table if we can’t see the contents?”

Attribute table with large type size
ArcMap attribute table with large type size

When bringing in screenshots of attribute tables or any dialog box into PowerPoint, I first set the size of the window so that I have a predictable, consistent size for every one.  There is an incredibly useful, free utility for Windows called Sizer (http://www.brianapps.net/sizer/), that allows you to set custom window sizes (it does not officially support 64-bit Windows 7, but I have not had any issues).  Since I show a lot of tables and dialog boxes in my lectures, I find it helpful to maintain consistent sizes throughout.

Sizer freeware
Sizer dialog box for setting custom window sizes.

As time-consuming as slide design can be, I really enjoy the process, as I’m always trying to find a simpler, more effective way to tell a story.  I hope the above tips will help streamline your workflow and help you do the same.

 

Mar 082011
 

Like many technology-oriented people, I consider myself to be a bit of a perfectionist.  There’s something about the crisp, exact, digital world that makes me want to fuss over pixel, every detail.  To be clear, I’m not saying this in a braggy, interview way (“My worst fault? Well I guess you could say I’m a perfectionist!”), but more of a confessional way (“Hello, my name is Don, and I’m a perfectionist”).  Yes, I do think that this personality trait has driven me to produce good quality work.  However, I suspect it also often leads to procrastination.

A good example is related to my intention to start using video capture software to create online software demos for my students as a way of introducing them to a new practical assignment.  I have had this on my “to do” list for at least a year, but two things kept holding me back: 1) I was afraid of the time commitment required, since once I started doing them I assumed students would come to expect them all the time  2) I wanted the demos to be perfect.  I bought a copy of Adobe’s eLearning Suite 2, and pecked away at it over a few months, but kept putting off actually creating a demo.  Then, last week, I was going over the lab assignment I was about to give to students on some basic remote sensing principles, using ERDAS IMAGINE (why do they insist on all caps?).  All I wanted them to do was use the spectral profile tools with a small Landsat Thematic Mapper image to explore the digital numbers for various land cover types in different spectral bands.  I have used this assignment before, so thought I would just give it a quick once-over before distributing it.  Then I realized that I hadn’t really spent much time with the new 2010 version of IMAGINE and realized that they had “improved” the interface (if you can call adopting Microsoft’s “ribbon” an improvement, although the old IMAGINE interface did need a big overhaul).  I spent at least half an hour rediscovering where everything was, and quickly realized my students would be pretty lost trying to find their way around the interface, for what was meant to be a brief introduction to IMAGINE.  So, I thought I would try putting together a quick video demo.  I didn’t have much time, so I opened IMAGINE, sized the various windows, started Captivate, and recorded the demo.  It was pretty rough, but I thought to heck with it, just get it out there, so I did.  You can have a look at it here.  It’s not very good – I would like to add a title slide, delete some of the extra captions that come up when I was unnecessarily clicking around window title bars, possibly resize it, and maybe actually have a script (if you have any suggestions, please let me know).  The point though, is that it got done, I gave it to my students and, so far, I have had very positive feedback.  The fact that I didn’t spend much time on it really addressed both of my concerns: I don’t mind if they come to expect them, since I can now do them in a short amount of time.

Just to add some irony, I thought about blogging about this, then hesitated, as I thought I should really make a new, better version, and do all those edits first.  Then it dawned on me: my new approach to teaching and blogging is going to be “quick and dirty, learn as you go” or QADLAYG (I haven’t Googled this phrase, so please allow me to continue to think that I am the first person to ever come up with this idea and acronym). For me, this has been a useful lesson.  I have to push myself sometimes to get beyond the planning, perfectionism, and someday-I’ll-get-around-to-it phase and just start putting something out there.  Of course, I definitely plan to improve, but I no longer plan to wait until something is perfect before I distribute it.  I’m guessing I will be better off getting feedback and learning as I go instead of waiting.